The Comet

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'''The Comet''' is a [[zine]] that was first published in 1930 by Raymond Palmer.
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[[Image:Comet1-s_copy.jpg‎|right|frame|'''The Comet'''<br/>Issue 1 May 1930]]
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'''The Comet''' is a fanzine that was published in 1930 in the U.S.A. by Raymond Palmer and Walter Dennis.
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'''The Comet''' is widely acknowledged as being the first science fiction  [[fanzine]] ever published. It was edited by Raymond Arthur Palmer and published by the Science Correspondence Club. As the name of the publishers suggests, it has its origins in correspondence between science fiction fans. Naturally, the letter section of '''The Comet''' was a prominent feature of the zine, where readers discussed issues concerning science, science fiction and fiction.
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''The Comet'' is widely acknowledged as being the first science fiction  fanzine ever published. It was edited by Raymond Arthur Palmer and published by the Science Correspondence Club. As the name of the publisher suggests, it has its origins in correspondence between science fiction fans. Naturally, the letter section of ''The Comet'' was a prominent feature of the zine, where readers discussed issues concerning science, science fiction and fiction.  
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Other science fiction zines following in the wake of '''The Comet''' included ''[[The Time Traveller]]'' and ''[[Science Fiction]]'', edited by Jerome Siegal, one of the creators of ''Superman''.
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Contributors to this first issue, dated May 1930, included [[Lilith Lorraine]], among others.
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'''The Comet''' was published for many years, later being renamed ''Cosmology''. Raymond Palmer went on to edit ''Amazing Stories'' and ''Fantastic Adventures'' and a number of other magazines issued by his own  publishing company.
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After the first issue, the title changed to ''Science Correspondence Club Organ'' for the second and third issues. The fourth issue was titled ''Science Correspondence Club Bulletin''. After the fourth issue (September 1930), A.W. Gowing assumed editorship, and changed the title to ''Cosmology'', the title it retained until the seventeenth and final issue (1933). Editorship changed hands once again, though, for the final four issues, to Aubrey McDermott and Clifton Amsbury. Because of the number of issues published as ''Cosmology'', the series as a whole is most commonly referred to by that title; in their ''Fanzine Index'', for instance, Pavlat and Evans catalogue all seventeen issues under ''Cosmology''.
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[[Category:Zine|Comet, The]] [[Category:Science Fiction Zines|Comet, The]] [[Category: 1930's publications|Comet, The]]
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Other science fiction zines following in the wake of ''The Comet'' included ''[[The Time Traveller]]'' and ''[[Science Fiction]]'', edited by Jerome Siegel, one of the creators of ''Superman''.
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Raymond Palmer went on to edit ''Amazing Stories'' and ''Fantastic Adventures'' and a number of other magazines issued by his own  publishing company.
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[[Category:Zine|Comet, The]]
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[[Category:Zines from the U.S.A.]]
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[[Category:Science Fiction Zines|Comet, The]]  
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[[Category: 1930's publications|Comet, The]]

Current revision

The CometIssue 1 May 1930
The Comet
Issue 1 May 1930

The Comet is a fanzine that was published in 1930 in the U.S.A. by Raymond Palmer and Walter Dennis.

The Comet is widely acknowledged as being the first science fiction fanzine ever published. It was edited by Raymond Arthur Palmer and published by the Science Correspondence Club. As the name of the publisher suggests, it has its origins in correspondence between science fiction fans. Naturally, the letter section of The Comet was a prominent feature of the zine, where readers discussed issues concerning science, science fiction and fiction.

Contributors to this first issue, dated May 1930, included Lilith Lorraine, among others.

After the first issue, the title changed to Science Correspondence Club Organ for the second and third issues. The fourth issue was titled Science Correspondence Club Bulletin. After the fourth issue (September 1930), A.W. Gowing assumed editorship, and changed the title to Cosmology, the title it retained until the seventeenth and final issue (1933). Editorship changed hands once again, though, for the final four issues, to Aubrey McDermott and Clifton Amsbury. Because of the number of issues published as Cosmology, the series as a whole is most commonly referred to by that title; in their Fanzine Index, for instance, Pavlat and Evans catalogue all seventeen issues under Cosmology.

Other science fiction zines following in the wake of The Comet included The Time Traveller and Science Fiction, edited by Jerome Siegel, one of the creators of Superman.

Raymond Palmer went on to edit Amazing Stories and Fantastic Adventures and a number of other magazines issued by his own publishing company.

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