Sfinx

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Editors varied with each issue. Diana Reed was editor for #5, published in 1972; Kevin Smith was editor for #7, which was nominated for a [[Nova Award for Best Fanzine]] in 1973, and also editor for #9, published in 1974; Peter D. Jones edited #10, published in 1975.
Editors varied with each issue. Diana Reed was editor for #5, published in 1972; Kevin Smith was editor for #7, which was nominated for a [[Nova Award for Best Fanzine]] in 1973, and also editor for #9, published in 1974; Peter D. Jones edited #10, published in 1975.
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David Langford was a frequent contributor. In his book, "The Sex Column and Other Misprints", he describes finding the publication; "So when I went to Oxford for three years of failing to study physics, I was primed to seek out SF contacts. Sure enough, the crowded notice-board of my college featured the cover of an obviously SF publication called ''Sfinx'' - the university SF group's fiction magazine...You could tell the publishers had cosmic minds, by their total failure to provide a price or address. But I tracked them down anyway."
[[Category:Zine]]
[[Category:Zine]]

Revision as of 23:15, 24 May 2012

Sfinx was a science fiction fanzine published by the Oxford University Speculative Fiction Group.

Sfinx was published in the UK, and appeared in the early 1970s.

Editors varied with each issue. Diana Reed was editor for #5, published in 1972; Kevin Smith was editor for #7, which was nominated for a Nova Award for Best Fanzine in 1973, and also editor for #9, published in 1974; Peter D. Jones edited #10, published in 1975.

David Langford was a frequent contributor. In his book, "The Sex Column and Other Misprints", he describes finding the publication; "So when I went to Oxford for three years of failing to study physics, I was primed to seek out SF contacts. Sure enough, the crowded notice-board of my college featured the cover of an obviously SF publication called Sfinx - the university SF group's fiction magazine...You could tell the publishers had cosmic minds, by their total failure to provide a price or address. But I tracked them down anyway."

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