Eerie Country

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'''Eerie Country''' is a horror and weird fiction fanzine by W. Paul Ganley.  
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[[Image:Eerie_Country_copy.jpg‎|right]]
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'''Eerie Country''' is a horror and weird fiction fanzine by [[W. Paul Ganley]].  
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In the 1950s, Ganley had published the science fiction fanzine [[Fan-Fare (U.S.A.)|Fan-Fare]]. He returned to publishing in the 1970s with the release of ''Eerie Country'', devoted to weird fiction, suspense and horror stories and poetry.
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In the 1950s, Ganley had published the science fiction fanzine [[Fan-Fare (U.S.A.)|Fan-Fare]]. He returned to publishing in the 1970s with the release of ''Eerie Country'', devoted to weird fiction, suspense and horror stories, and poetry. Published in Buffalo, New York, U.S.A., nine issues were released, the first issue appeared in 1976, and the last in 1982.  
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Artwork was by Frank Hamilton (cover: #3), Todd Klein (cover: #2), Allen Koszowski, J. K. Potter, Jim Pianfetti, W. Fraser Sandercombe, and others.  
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Artwork was by Dan Day, Ken Hahn ([[Jeet]]), Frank Hamilton, James William Hjort, Jason Keehn, Todd Klein, Allen Koszowski, J. K. Potter, Jim Pianfetti, Joy Riddle, W. Fraser Sandercombe, John L. Sies, and others.  
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Fiction was by Mildred H. Arthur, Frank Bambara, Gerald Barnes, Branley Allan Branson, Arthur Griffin, Phillip C. Heath, F.L.A. Hod, Earnest Johnson, Ray Jones, Raymond Kaminski, Phyllis Karr ([[The Literary Magazine of Fantasy and Terror]]), Rachel Kemper, Gordon Linzer ([[Space and Time]]), Brian Lumley, T.G. Lyman, Dave Reiddig, Robert Ritter, [[Jessica Amanda Salmonson]] ([[Fantasy Macabre]]), , W. Fraser Sandercombe, Darrell Schweitzer, Roman Scott, Walton Simons, William H. Stout, John Taylor, Ruth M. Walsh, and John Wysocki..
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Fiction was by Mildred H. Arthur, Frank Bambara, Gerald Barnes, Clifford Blair, Branley Allan Branson, William Doxey, Arthur Griffin (pseudonym for Ganley), Phillip C. Heath, P. Scott Hollander, F.L.A. Hood, Ernest Johnson, Ray Jones, Raymond Kaminski, Phyllis Karr ([[The Literary Magazine of Fantasy and Terror]]), Rachel Kemper, Gordon Linzner ([[Space and Time]]), T.G. Lyman, Dave Reiddig, Robert Ritter, James P. Roberts, Melody Rogers, [[Jessica Amanda Salmonson]] ([[Fantasy Macabre]]), W. Fraser Sandercombe, Darrell Schweitzer, Roman Scott, Walton Simons, William H. Stout, John Taylor, Ruth M. Walsh, and John Wysocki.
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Poetry came from  Bernadette Bosky, Joseph Payne Brennan ([[Macabre (U.S.A.)|Macabre]]), Robert E, Briney, Steve Eng, Joey Froehlich, William Scott Home, Steve Troyanovich, and others.   
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Poetry came from  Bernadette Bosky, Joseph Payne Brennan ([[Macabre (U.S.A.)|Macabre]], [[Essence]]), Robert E. Briney ([[Cataclysm]]), Steve Eng, Joey Froehlich, Paul Garson, William Scott Home, Lyn Lifshin, Brian Lumley, Robert Randolph Medcalf Jr. ([[Apogee]]), W. Fraser Sandercombe, Darrell Schweitzer, Steve Troyanovich, Billy Wolfenbarger, and others.   
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Two stories first published in ''Erie Country'', "The Light at Curry's Point" by Ernest Johnson and "Music of the Void" by William H. Stout are considered part of the [[Cthulhu Mythos]].
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In 1988 Ganley published the one-shot ''Weirdbook Sampler''. In 1990 Ganley began publishing ''Weirdbook Encores'', giving the first issue under this title #11, noting that it was a continuation of ''Eerie Country'' and ''Weirdbook Sampler''. ''Encores'' ran four issues, ceasing publication with #14 in 1993. W. Paul Ganley also published the weird, fantasy, and horror poetry zine [[Amanita Brandy]].
[[Category:Zine]]
[[Category:Zine]]
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[[Category:Zines from the U.S.A.]]
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[[Category:New York Zines]]
[[Category:1970's publications]]
[[Category:1970's publications]]
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[[Category:1980's publications]]
[[Category:Literary Zines]]
[[Category:Literary Zines]]
[[Category:Supernatural]]
[[Category:Supernatural]]
[[Category:Horror Zines]]
[[Category:Horror Zines]]

Current revision

Eerie Country is a horror and weird fiction fanzine by W. Paul Ganley.

In the 1950s, Ganley had published the science fiction fanzine Fan-Fare. He returned to publishing in the 1970s with the release of Eerie Country, devoted to weird fiction, suspense and horror stories, and poetry. Published in Buffalo, New York, U.S.A., nine issues were released, the first issue appeared in 1976, and the last in 1982.

Artwork was by Dan Day, Ken Hahn (Jeet), Frank Hamilton, James William Hjort, Jason Keehn, Todd Klein, Allen Koszowski, J. K. Potter, Jim Pianfetti, Joy Riddle, W. Fraser Sandercombe, John L. Sies, and others.

Fiction was by Mildred H. Arthur, Frank Bambara, Gerald Barnes, Clifford Blair, Branley Allan Branson, William Doxey, Arthur Griffin (pseudonym for Ganley), Phillip C. Heath, P. Scott Hollander, F.L.A. Hood, Ernest Johnson, Ray Jones, Raymond Kaminski, Phyllis Karr (The Literary Magazine of Fantasy and Terror), Rachel Kemper, Gordon Linzner (Space and Time), T.G. Lyman, Dave Reiddig, Robert Ritter, James P. Roberts, Melody Rogers, Jessica Amanda Salmonson (Fantasy Macabre), W. Fraser Sandercombe, Darrell Schweitzer, Roman Scott, Walton Simons, William H. Stout, John Taylor, Ruth M. Walsh, and John Wysocki.

Poetry came from Bernadette Bosky, Joseph Payne Brennan (Macabre, Essence), Robert E. Briney (Cataclysm), Steve Eng, Joey Froehlich, Paul Garson, William Scott Home, Lyn Lifshin, Brian Lumley, Robert Randolph Medcalf Jr. (Apogee), W. Fraser Sandercombe, Darrell Schweitzer, Steve Troyanovich, Billy Wolfenbarger, and others.

Two stories first published in Erie Country, "The Light at Curry's Point" by Ernest Johnson and "Music of the Void" by William H. Stout are considered part of the Cthulhu Mythos.

In 1988 Ganley published the one-shot Weirdbook Sampler. In 1990 Ganley began publishing Weirdbook Encores, giving the first issue under this title #11, noting that it was a continuation of Eerie Country and Weirdbook Sampler. Encores ran four issues, ceasing publication with #14 in 1993. W. Paul Ganley also published the weird, fantasy, and horror poetry zine Amanita Brandy.

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