Craphound

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[[Image:craphound-cover.jpg|frame|Craphound cover]]
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== Headline text ==
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[[Image:craphound-cover.jpg|frame|Crap Hound cover]]
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'''Craphound''' is a full-size ''Picture Book for Discussion and Activity'' by [[Sean Tejaratchi]]. The [[zine]] consists mostly of royalty-free [[clip-art]], along with brief essays and satirical features. The large issues are filled with high-contrast line art culled from vintage catalogs, advertising, obscure books, and found ephemera.  
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Between a brief introduction and the end credits, '''Crap Hound''' edited by by [[Sean Tejaratchi]] is pure imagery. Each page is filled with high-contrast art, culled from vintage catalogs, advertising, obscure books, and found ephemera. Although widely used as an art and design resource, '''Crap Hound''' warns, "Many images in Crap Hound are copyrighted by lawsuit-friendly entities. Remember that Crap Hound is a mixture of social commentary and somewhat overindulgent graphic design. It is not a means to trample the fragile rights of huge corporations. Remember: there's no "U" in copyright infringement. Crap Hound officially urges you to obey all laws, all the time."
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Each issue explores a different subject in its imagery, past subjects have ranged from Hands, Hearts & Eyes to Clowns, Devils and Bait.
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Each issue explores one or more themes. As of October 2011 they are as follows:<br>
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Crap Hound #1: Death, Telephones & Scissors (out of print)<br>
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Crap Hound #2: Sex & Kitchen Gadgets Part 1 (out of print)<br>
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Crap Hound #3: Sex & Kitchen Gadgets Part 2 (out of print)<br>
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Crap Hound #4: Clowns, Devils & Bait (1st edition out of print, 2nd edition in print)<br>
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Crap Hound #5: Hands, Hearts & Eyes (1st & 2nd edition out of print, 3rd edition in print)<br>
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Crap Hound #6: Death, Telephones & Scissors (heavily revised and expanded reprint of #1, out of print)<br>
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Crap Hound #7: Church & State Part 1 (in print)<br>
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Crap Hound #8: Superstitions (in print)<br>
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Craphound began as a smaller photocopied zine and has blossomed in to a sizable magazine-like format. It's found an audience with [[Zinester|zine makers]], graphic designers and tattoo artists. Out-of-print issues are in high demand. The most recent issues have been re-published by [[Show & Tell Press]] run by [[Chloe Eudaly]] of [[Reading Frenzy]].  
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Crap Hound was first self-published in 1994, in Portland, OR with a print run of 500. Since 2005 it has been published by [[Show & Tell Press]] run by [[Chloe Eudaly]] of [[Reading Frenzy]]. While the format has remained the same, the length has increased to nearly 100 pages per issue and the current print run is 5000. It's found an wide, international audience with [[Zinester|zine makers]], graphic designers, crafters, and tattoo artists. It's distributed throughout the US, Canada, UK, Europe and Japan. Out-of-print issues are in high demand and run upwards of $100.  
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Craphound, and the art work of Sean Tejaratchi, was featured in the exhibition ''[[The Copyist Conspiracy: An Exhibition of Zine Art]]'' in San Francisco in 2005.
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As of fall 2011, Sean Tejaratchi has begun work on an book length version of Crap Hound featuring "Unhappy People" for Feral House Press. Show & Tell Press will continue to reprint back issues and publish new issues as they are able.
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Crap Hound, and the art work of Sean Tejaratchi, was featured in the exhibition ''[[The Copyist Conspiracy: An Exhibition of Zine Art]]'' in San Francisco in 2005.
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Issue #7 is scheduled to be reprinted and shipped in January of 2008.
 
==External links==
==External links==

Current revision

Headline text

Crap Hound cover
Crap Hound cover

Between a brief introduction and the end credits, Crap Hound edited by by Sean Tejaratchi is pure imagery. Each page is filled with high-contrast art, culled from vintage catalogs, advertising, obscure books, and found ephemera. Although widely used as an art and design resource, Crap Hound warns, "Many images in Crap Hound are copyrighted by lawsuit-friendly entities. Remember that Crap Hound is a mixture of social commentary and somewhat overindulgent graphic design. It is not a means to trample the fragile rights of huge corporations. Remember: there's no "U" in copyright infringement. Crap Hound officially urges you to obey all laws, all the time."

Each issue explores one or more themes. As of October 2011 they are as follows:
Crap Hound #1: Death, Telephones & Scissors (out of print)
Crap Hound #2: Sex & Kitchen Gadgets Part 1 (out of print)
Crap Hound #3: Sex & Kitchen Gadgets Part 2 (out of print)
Crap Hound #4: Clowns, Devils & Bait (1st edition out of print, 2nd edition in print)
Crap Hound #5: Hands, Hearts & Eyes (1st & 2nd edition out of print, 3rd edition in print)
Crap Hound #6: Death, Telephones & Scissors (heavily revised and expanded reprint of #1, out of print)
Crap Hound #7: Church & State Part 1 (in print)
Crap Hound #8: Superstitions (in print)

Crap Hound was first self-published in 1994, in Portland, OR with a print run of 500. Since 2005 it has been published by Show & Tell Press run by Chloe Eudaly of Reading Frenzy. While the format has remained the same, the length has increased to nearly 100 pages per issue and the current print run is 5000. It's found an wide, international audience with zine makers, graphic designers, crafters, and tattoo artists. It's distributed throughout the US, Canada, UK, Europe and Japan. Out-of-print issues are in high demand and run upwards of $100.

As of fall 2011, Sean Tejaratchi has begun work on an book length version of Crap Hound featuring "Unhappy People" for Feral House Press. Show & Tell Press will continue to reprint back issues and publish new issues as they are able.

Crap Hound, and the art work of Sean Tejaratchi, was featured in the exhibition The Copyist Conspiracy: An Exhibition of Zine Art in San Francisco in 2005.


External links

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